While trolling the internet after seeing the USA credit down grade, I found this interesting chart. Of course it has nothing to do with Millbrook, local news or anything else other than information that is fascinating. For instance Sweden, one of the highest taxed countries in the world has a AAA rating. Saudi Arabia, one of the richest countries in the world is AA-.

I think it is fair to say this issue is sufficiently complicated and political (I’ve avoided politics here so far) that only the  economists or radio hosts (likely neither useful)  have any strong opinions about the effect of our downgrade.

You have to admit that the flags at least are pretty. Maybe all the countries should have their credit ratings on their flags so when they enter the Olympic Stadium you will be able to tell by the cheers how solvent they are!

 

Below is the list:

 

Country? Rating? Outlook? Date? Ref.?
Abu Dhabi AA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Albania B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Andorra A Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Angola BB- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Argentina B Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Aruba A- Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Australia AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Austria AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Azerbaijan BB+ Positive Jul 2011 [2][3]
Bahamas BBB+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Bahrain BBB Watch Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Bangladesh BB- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Barbados BBB- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Belarus B Watch Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Belgium AA+ Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Belize B Watch Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Benin B Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Bermuda AA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Bolivia B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Bosnia and Herzegovina B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Botswana A- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Brazil BBB- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Bulgaria BBB Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Burkina Faso B Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Cambodia B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Cameroon B Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Canada AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Cape Verde B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Chile A+ Positive Jul 2011 [2][3]
China AA- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Colombia BBB- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Cook Islands BB- Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Costa Rica BB Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Croatia BBB- Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Cyprus BBB+ Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Czech Republic A Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Denmark AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Dominican Republic B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Ecuador B- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Egypt BB Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
El Salvador BB- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Ras Al Khaimah A Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Estonia A Positive Jul 2011 [2][3]
Fiji B- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Finland AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
France AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Gabon BB- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Georgia B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Germany AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Ghana B Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Greece CC Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Grenada B- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Guatemala BB Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Guernsey AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Honduras B Positive Jul 2011 [2][3]
Hong Kong AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Hungary BBB- Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Iceland BBB- Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
India BBB- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Indonesia BB+ Positive Jul 2011 [2][3]
Ireland BBB+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Isle of Man AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Israel A Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Italy A+ Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Jamaica B- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Japan AA- Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Jordan BB Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Kazakhstan BBB Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Kenya B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
South Korea A Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Kuwait AA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Latvia BB+ Positive Jul 2011 [2][3]
Lebanon B Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Liechtenstein AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Lithuania BBB Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Luxembourg AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Macedonia BB Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Malaysia A- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Malta A Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Mexico BBB Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Mongolia BB- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Montenegro BB Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Montserrat BBB- Positive Jul 2011 [2][3]
Morocco BBB- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Mozambique B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Netherlands AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
New Zealand AA+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Nigeria B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Norway AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Oman A Watch Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Pakistan B- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Panama BBB- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Papua New Guinea B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Paraguay B+ Positive Jul 2011 [2][3]
Peru BBB- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Philippines BB Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Poland A- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Portugal BBB- Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Qatar AA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Romania BB+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Russia BBB Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Saudi Arabia AA- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Senegal B+ Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Serbia BB Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Singapore AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Slovak Republic A+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Slovenia AA Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
South Africa BBB+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Spain AA Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Sri Lanka B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Suriname B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Sweden AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Switzerland AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Taiwan AA- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Thailand BBB+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Trinidad and Tobago A Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Tunisia BBB- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Turkey BB Positive Jul 2011 [2][3]
Uganda B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Ukraine B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
United Kingdom AAA Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
United States of America AA+ Negative Aug 2011 [4][5]
Uruguay BB+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Venezuela BB- Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]
Vietnam BB- Negative Jul 2011 [2][3]
Zambia B+ Stable Jul 2011 [2][3]

 

 

5 thoughts on “Unrelated subject- Credit Ratings

  1. I am less interested in what economics experts think of the fundamental significance of this credit downgrade than I am in
    what experts in mob psychology believe will be American voters’ reactions. I don’t recall political science experts predicting
    the impact of right-wing talk radio/tv (until it became obvious).

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  2. UK public sector net debt was £920.9 billion (equivalent to 60.6 per cent of GDP of National GDP) – (note this excludes financial sector intervention.)
    Source: Office National Statistics [1] (page updated July 18th, 2011)

    If all financial sector intervention is included (e.g. Royal Bank of Scotland, Lloyds) , the Net debt was £2252.9 billion or 148.9% per cent. This is known as the unadjusted measure of public sector net debt.
    AND FOR THIS OUTRAGE THEY GET AAA AND STABLE?

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  3. and so the blame game starts as, predictably, Republicans “blast Obama”, and Dems will blame Tea party, the tail that wagged the Republican elephant.
    BTW it is not inevitable that interest rates will rise across the board; didn’t happen in Japan when they went less than AAA.

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  4. Very glad to have the chart. Thanks!

    Hate to say it, but the countries still rated AAA seem in general like, well, better, saner countries than we are right now.

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