A poem by Robert Service in a small book of poems entitled, “Rhymes of a Red Cross Man”, and dedicated to his brother Albert Service who died in the Great War.

Oh, weren’t they the fine boys! You never saw the beat of them,
Singing all together with their throats bronze-bare;
Fighting-fit and mirth-mad, music in the feet of them,
Swinging on to glory and the wrath out there.
Laughing by and chaffing by, frolic in the smiles of them,
On the road, the white road, all the afternoon;
Strangers in a strange land, miles and miles and miles of them,
Battle-bound and heart-high, and singing this tune:

It’s a long way to Tipperary,
It’s a long way to go;
It’s a long way to Tipperary,
And the sweetest girl I know.
Good-bye, Piccadilly,
Farewell, Lester Square:
It’s a long, long way to Tipperary,
But my heart’s right there.

The gallant old “Contemptibles”! There isn’t much remains of them,
So full of fun and fitness, and a-singing in their pride;
For some are cold as clabber and the corby picks the brains of them,
And some are back in Blighty, and a-wishing they had died.
And yet it seems but yesterday, that great, glad sight of them,
Swinging on to battle as the sky grew black and black;
But oh their glee and glory, and the great, grim fight of them! —
Just whistle Tipperary and it all comes back:

It’s a long way to Tipperary,
It’s a long way to go;
It’s a long way to Tipperary,
And the sweetest girl I know.
Good-bye, Piccadilly,
Farewell, Lester Square:
It’s a long, long way to Tipperary,
But my heart’s right there